Santonian News Central

Discussion in 'National RolePlay' started by Kyle, Aug 23, 2018.

  1. Kyle

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    Saintonge confirms the Nationals’ huge majority in the second round

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    Seat distribution in the 51st National Assembly.

    Results of the Second Round of
    the Parliamentary Elections


    National Party win
    Saintes-1
    Saintes-2
    Saintes-6
    Saintes-14
    Saintes-15
    Saintes-19
    Saintes-20
    Saintes-21
    Saintes-26
    Saintes-28
    Basses-Alpes-4
    Arc-1
    Arc-2
    Argens-2
    Argens-3
    Aure-3
    Baltée-2
    Baltée-3
    Baltée-4
    Basse-Bléone-1
    Basse-Bléone-2
    Haute-Bléone-1
    Haute-Bléone-2
    Basses-Brômes-6
    Basses-Brômes-7
    Basses-Brômes-9
    Hautes-Brômes-2
    Besbre-4
    Besbre-5
    Bouche-du-Rhâne-4
    Bouche-du-Rhâne-5
    Bouche-du-Rhâne-6
    Breuse-1
    Breuse-3
    Breuse-5
    Capoterre-2
    Chalaronne-5
    Côle-7
    Corb-4
    Doire-5
    Dropt-5
    Dropt-8
    Haine-4
    Haine-5
    Haute-Saine-1
    Haute-Saine-2
    Inde-1
    Inde-3
    Lac-1
    Lauter-3
    Lisle-3
    Lys-2
    Margerides-2
    Monce-et-Briance-4
    Monce-et-Briance-5
    Nébrodes-5
    Puy-d'Or-5
    Puy-d'Or-7
    Queyras-3
    Saine-et-Loine-6
    Saine-et-Loine-7
    Saine-et-Loine-15
    Saine-et-Loine-16
    Saine-et-Loine-17
    Saine-et-Loine-18
    Saine-et-Loine-20
    Sambre-4
    Sambre-5
    Sâne-1
    Sâne-2
    Sarine-10
    Sarine-2
    Sarine-5
    Scyotte-7
    Sebre-1
    Semois-2
    Semois-4
    Semois-5
    Semois-6
    Semois-8
    Seudre-5
    Seudre-6
    Seudre-7
    Simbruins-5
    Simbruins-9
    Simbruins-10
    Simbruins-12
    Sûre-1
    Sûre-2
    Tage-4
    Tessin-3
    Trieux-2
    Trieux-3
    Vôges-1
    Vôges-2


    Liberal Party win
    Saintes-17
    Saintes-22
    Saintes-24
    Saintes-25
    Basses-Alpes-5
    Basses-Brômes-4
    Corb-7
    Corb-8
    Doire-8
    Dropt-6
    Lauter-1
    Lisle-2
    Monce-et-Briance-3
    Sarine-3
    Sarine-6
    Vauperté


    Radical Party win
    Saintes-23
    Saintes-29
    Argens-4
    Capoterre-3
    Capoterre-4
    Haine-7
    Lisle-1
    Sarine-7
    Simbruins-4
    Tage-3
    Trieux-4


    Green Party win
    Saintes-16
    Saintes-18
    Haut-Rhâne
    Semois-1
    by Anne-Marcelline de Saint-Corentin
    23 June 2019 - 1253h

    SAINTES – results from the second round of the Santonian parliamentary elections re-confirms the massive majority the electorate gave the National Party. Of the 126 seats that elected their parliamentary deputy in this round, 95 were won by the Nationals, 16 by the Liberals, 11 by the Radicals, and 4 by the Greens. The Nationals now have 377 out of the 431 seats, more than the three-fourths majority that can amend the Constitution of Saintonge.

    Second round
    Electoral districts where no candidate attained a majority of the vote in the first round last 25 May selected their parliamentary deputies yesterday from the top two candidates in the first round. 100 of the districts had a Liberal and a National competing; 21 had a Radical and a National candidate; one had a Liberal and a Radical candidate; and four were effectively conceded to the Greens by the National Party in an electoral agreement last 7 June.

    Status of the National Assembly
    With all of the districts releasing their results, the National Party will have 377 seats, the Liberals 33, the Radicals 17, and the Greens 4. The results were a disaster for both the Liberals and the Radicals: the Liberals went down from 176 to 33 seats and the Radicals from 36 to 17 seats.

    “Landslide”
    Most observers and analysts described the results as a “landslide”. Most analysts had no doubt that the Nationals will breach the three-fourths majority, but winning 377 seats was on the far end of their predictions. “Most predictions, including mine, put the Nationals at 320-350 seats,” said electoral analyst Brice-Gauthier Kermadec, “but 377 seats… that’s the best showing of any Santonian political party since the 1900 landslide of Prime Minister Marc-Childéric Battiston.”

    Kermadec gives credit to the Nationals’ organisation and the electoral agreement with the Greens. “Exit polls showed that on average, the Nationals retained 86% of its voters in the first round – a pretty high number. It meant that the Nationals were able to keep their voters interested despite having already won a commanding majority,” said Kermadec. “Also unprecedented is how the Greens turned out to support the Nationals against the Coalition. Normally the Green vote scatters in the second round, but here we saw that almost two-thirds of Green votes transferred to the Nationals. This is the first time that the majority of the Green vote transferred to a single party.”

    “The election was fought on the economy,” said political analyst Marie-Danielle Ponceau. “And on economic issues, the Greens are closer to the Nationals than to the Coalition. This, together with Ms. Courseaux’s surprise electoral agreement with the Greens, meant that the bulk of the Green vote will go to them.”

    The electoral agreement paid off in seats such as both electoral circumscriptions of the Haute-Bléone. Despite the Liberal incumbents edging out the National candidates in the first round in the Haute-Bléone, the districts’ large Green votes transferred to the Nationals, turning both of the Haute-Bléone’s districts red for the first time since 1940. Such pattern was repeated throughout most of southern Saintonge, where the Greens have pockets of support.

    Prominent Coalition ministers defeated
    Nine of the eleven Coalition ministers who were forced to the second round were defeated by the Nationals.

    Commerce Minister Théodore Prêcheur (Liberal) was defeated in the Haute-Saine-2 due to the large Green transfers to the Nationals, despite the Nationals also supporting the PTS expansion. Another minister reeling from the effect of the Green transfers is Environment Minister Sylvie-Marie Beiler (Liberal), who lost in the Haute-Bléone-1.

    Also in the south, Industry Minister Pantaléon Giraudeau (Liberal) lost in the previously safe Sâne-2, while Justice Minister Joseph-Humbert Frotland (Liberal), dogged by scandal, was recalled by Vôges-2.

    Defense Minister Ludovic Couvier (Liberal) was ejected from his longtime seat of Sambre-4.

    Two Saine-et-Loine districts recalled their ministers: Communications Minister Giselle Pillet-Dumilâtre (Liberal) lost in Saine-et-Loine-15, and Education Minister Marie-Véronique Bouthillier (Liberal) lost in Saine-et-Loine-6. Coupled with the results in the other five Saine-et-Loine districts (all National wins), currently all of the Saine-et-Loine’s 23 districts are in National hands. The Saine-et-Loine is the home department of Prime Minister-elect Anne-Douceline Courseaux.

    Two Radical ministers, thought to be sitting in safe seats, were defeated yesterday: Philippe-Rainier de Créquy in Trieux-3 and Denis-Emmanuel d'Homme-Dieu in Tage-4. Both the races in Trieux-3 and Tage-4 were remarkable in their own right. Trieux-3 elected Jérôme-Faustin Fresnel de Comborn, the youngest deputy ever elected to the National Assembly; while Tage-4, centred in the city of Mirande, elected its first National deputy in a hundred years.

    GCC retains his seat
    Radical leader Georges Conté de Caunes retained his seat of Capoterre-3 by a huge margin. The two ministers who successfully defended their seats were also Radicals: Labour Minister Jean-Charles Caruhel and Church Affairs Minister Louis-Auguste-François Primeau d'Avennes were reelected by Saintes-29 and Lisle-1, respectively. The Radicals’ parliamentary leader, Jean-Étienne Genêt, was also returned by Saintes-23.

    However, the Radicals lost Corb-7 to the Liberals, as the National vote transferred to the Liberal challenger.

    Closest Districts
    The ten closest districts during yesterday’s election were:
    1. Dropt-6 (Liberal): 50.03%
    2. Monce-et-Briance-3 (Liberal): 50.11%

    3. Sarine-2 (National): 50.18%
    4. Basses-Brômes-7 (National): 50.20%

    5. Vauperté (Liberal): 50.22%
    6. Haute-Saine-2 (National): 50.25%
    7. Doire-8 (Liberal): 50.26%
    8. Seudre-6 (National): 50.33%
    9. Lisle-3 (National): 50.41%

    10. Basses-Alpes-5 (Liberal): 50.41%

    [​IMG]
    Final results of the 2019 National Assembly elections by electoral circumscription.

    Prime Minister election
    King Thibault II is expected to invite National Party leader Anne-Douceline Courseaux to form a government later this week. The newly-reconstituted National Assembly will reconvene on 8 July. The confirmation vote for the prospective Prime Minister and her prospective Cabinet will be held later that week. The House of Lords is set to reconvene on 5 August, although the upper house of Parliament does not participate in government formation.

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    Last edited: Jul 16, 2019
  2. Kyle

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    National Assembly confirms Courseaux government

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    Prime Minister Anne-Douceline Courseaux in Parliament yesterday.

    by Mélanie Bacrot in Saintes
    9 July 2019 - 1447h

    SAINTES – the Santonian National Assembly earlier today confirmed National Party leader Anne-Douceline Courseaux’s proposed government in a 377-50 vote. The Nationals voted for their own government, with the Liberals and Radicals opposed. The Greens abstained from voting. This conclusion was largely foregone, after the National Party's massive win in the 2019 parliamentary elections.

    New Government
    King Thibault II invited Ms. Courseaux to form a government on 27 June. The proposed government is composed of 22 ministers – 11 male and 11 female, the first gender-parity government in Saintonge. Only one alteration was made during the proposal: Matthieu-Gauvain Lamblin (N, 1st Haute-Loine), initially slated for the Agriculture Ministry, instead became the National Party’s floor leader in the National Assembly.

    Prime Minister: Anne-Douceline Courseaux (N, 21st Saine-et-Loine)
    Deputy Prime Ministers without Portfolio: Paul-Geoffroy Barèges (N, 3rd Seudre), Ernestine-Guenièvre Thieriot (N, 2nd Nébrodes)
    Minister of Agriculture and Food: Georges-Fulbet Meslot (N, 4th Loing)
    Minister of Church Affairs: Geneviève Boisjoly (N, 2nd Loine)
    Minister of Commerce: Isabelle Vautrin-Caillaud (N, 30th Saintes)
    Minister of Communication: Anne-Gertrude Tempier (N, 2nd Besbre)
    Minister of Culture and Sport: Alexandre-Stachys de Beaucroissant (N, 1st Sarine)
    Minister of Defence: Marc-Maëlmon de Liescoët (N, 1st Authie)
    Minister of Education: Marie-Solange Lépine-Desputeaux (N, 4th Saintes)
    Minister of Energy: Florian-Donnedieu Mattus (N, 5th Corb)
    Minister of Environment: Thierry-Diedéric Baesler (N, 4th Breuse)
    Minister of Finance: Maximilian Leclère de Rochebloine (N, 2nd Aubrac)
    Minister of Foreign Relations: Marcelline Tréhet (N, 2nd Côtes-du-Nord)
    Minister of Health: Baudouin-Landon Colcombet (N, 1st Hautes-Andes)
    Minister of Industry: Anne-Marguerite Scellier (N, 2nd Tech)
    Minister of Interior: Charles-Archambault Bathenay (N, 1st Yerres)
    Minister of Justice: Brice-Thibault Bardoux de Rosencoat (N, 2nd Sée)
    Minister of Labour: Jeanne-Élisabeth Vertières-Clérembault (N, 3rd Bouche-du-Rhâne)
    Minister of Public Works: James-Bertéric Battiston (N, 4th Basse-Bléone)
    Minister of Science & Technology: Chloé Bridey-Descotils (N, 9th Lisle)
    Minister of Social Welfare: Charlotte-Marie Graftiaux (N, 10th Cenise)
    Minister of Transportation: Julienne Micaux-Joyandet (N, 4th Puy-d'Or)

    The Courseaux government also has the youngest average age at 44 years. The youngest minister is Culture and Sport Minister Alexandre-Stachys de Beaucroissant (N, 1st Sarine), and the oldest is Defence Minister Marc-Maëlmon de Liescoët (N, 1st Authie), a retired admiral in the Royal Santonian Navy. Several other ministers made history in their own ministries: Brice-Thibault Bardoux de Rosencoat (N, 2nd Sée) and Charles-Archambault Bathenay (N, 1st Yerres) will be the youngest Justice and Interior ministers, respectively.

    Women making strides
    Aside from being the government having equal numbers of men and women, the 51st National Assembly also has the highest percentage of women deputies – 36% - thanks to the numerous female National Party deputies. All but four of the 155 female deputies are from the National Party; 40% of the National Party deputies are women. The National Assembly also elected the first female president (speaker) of the National Assembly, Sophie-Anne Laliberté (N, 1st Basses-Brômes), by a vote of 381-50. During the speaker election, the Greens also supported the election of Ms. Laliberté.

    Other Parties
    With the resignation of former Prime Minister Jean-Louis Hauteclocque de Champtoceaux as head of the Liberal Party, the much-reduced Liberal caucus in the National Assembly elected Paul-Lenthéric Baumann (L, 2nd Lauter) as their leader and the Leader of the Loyal Opposition. Their new Liberal floor leader will be Michel-Fernand Roux de Bézieux (L, 8th Sarine) after Geoffroy de Saint-Astier was defeated in his district in Trieux-1.

    The Radicals are retaining Georges Conté de Caunes (R, 4th Capoterre) as their leader, and Jean-Étienne Genêt (R, 23rd Saintes) as their floor leader. With decimated Liberal and Radical benches, the Baumann and Conté de Caunes are negotiating to form a united Loyal Opposition.

    Government programs
    The new government is expected to unveil its agenda in the Speech from the Throne tomorrow.

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    Last edited: Jul 16, 2019
  3. Kyle

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    L'Indépendant > Mercanti > Top Stories

    META faces Parliamentary resistance

    by Mélanie Bacrot in Saintes
    14 September 2019 - 1005h

    SAINTES – despite the National Party’s overwhelming majority in Parliament, several factions of the National Party are having cold feet over the ratification of the Meterra Economic Treaty Association (Association du traité économique meterrien, ATEM). The treaty is currently pending before the various committees of the National Assembly, Saintonge’s lower house of Parliament.

    Free trade clauses opposed
    The agrarian and labour factions of the National Party voiced their concerns over the free-trade aspects of the META. The agrarian faction raised the prospect of foreign agricultural products undermining the large Santonian agriculture industry. Deputy Théobald Trébuchon (N, 1st Ravennes) wanted the government to assess first the potential impact to the Santonian agriculture industry of opening the market to foreign products. Deputy Marie-Annette Méjansac (N, 3rd Luberon) raised the prospect of low-quality foreign products ‘tainted with banned pesticides’ entering the local market.

    Agriculture and Food Minister Georges-Fulbert Meslot (N, 4th Loing) tried to assuage the concerns of the agrarian faction. In a speech last week, Mr. Meslot addressed Mr. Trébuchon’s concern regarding flooding of the market. While the tariffs on foreign agricultural products will be lowered and eventually eliminated, the same is going to be done for Santonian products. The treaty, Mr. Meslot said, will widen the reach of Santonian products, many of which are well-sought abroad for their quality. The country’s protected products of desgination will also enjoy protection in other markets. Also, countries engaging in harmful trade practices will not be allowed to flood the market.

    Mr. Meslot also emphasised that Saintonge’s notoriously strict food laws and agricultural regulations will also apply to foreign products. It meant that foreign agricultural products produced using pesticides banned in Saintonge will not be allowed to be sold in the country.

    During Monday’s meeting of the National Assembly’s Committee on Agriculture and Food, the full committee voted 29-10 to order both the Ministry of Agriculture and the Parliamentary Research Office to produce a technical paper to advise the committee on the potential impact on the agricultural industry.

    The labour faction of the National Party also was concerned regarding the potential effect on wages in Saintonge. Deputy Anne-Caroline Desgranges (N, 5th Saintes) said that foreign companies with lower production costs due to ‘slave-like’ wages will undercut Santonian companies, forcing Santonian companies to cut wages as well in order to remain competitive. Commerce Minister Isabelle Vautrin-Caillaud (N, 30th Saintes) answered during the debate that Saintonge can still ‘ban’ products from companies found to violate workers’ rights, through the 2009 Fair Trade Practices Law, which states that Saintonge may refuse the entry of foreign products found to be produced by slave labour, child labour, or grossly unfair labour practices.

    Still, the National Assembly’s Committee on Labour voted 31-8 to approve the motion by deputy Jean-Quentin Hamel (N, 3rd Saintes) to order the Ministry of Labour and the Parliamentary Research Office to produce a technical paper, similar to the Agriculture Committee’s steps.

    Parliament votes to study the matter further
    Following the decisions of the Committees on Agriculture and Food and Labour, deputy Léa Ribéreau-Lesage (N, 2nd Côle) introduced a motion in the National Assembly last Thursday to ask all the government ministries to produce position papers on the potential impact of META on all sectors of Saintonge, not just in agriculture or in the labour sector. Ribéreau-Lesage’s motion also directed the Parliamentary Research Office to independently assess the effect of META on Saintonge, consolidating the actions of the two parliamentary committees. The motion, which was approved 375-0, will delay Parliament’s ratification of META by about six months to a year. The Liberals and Radicals abstained from the vote. All the National Party deputies present voted for, on instructions from the National Party’s parliamentary leader, Matthieu-Gauvain Lamblin (N, 1st Haute-Loine). “It was a goodwill gesture,” said Mr. Lamblin. “We understand our colleagues’ concerns regarding the treaty, and we do agree that META merits further study.”

    translation by Kyle MacTaggart-de Flesselles
    14 September 2019 - 1240h


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    Last edited: Sep 15, 2019