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Welcome to The North Pacific!
Where the democracy is strong, the debate robust, and the rum plentiful.


The North Pacific is one of the oldest and most powerful regions in NationStates. We pride ourselves on our strong democracy, openness, and transparency.

The region is affectionately called TNP. TNP is home to over 4,000 nations, called TNPers, and we are always looking for more to join us. We are glad to see you here and hope you decide become a TNPer yourself!

As a new arrival, you may be bewildered with everything that is going on. We understand, and for this reason, we have prepared this quick introduction to TNP. Unpack your bags, make yourself at home, and enjoy your stay :) .

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Our Government

The North Pacific is a constitutional democracy. We have a constitution, a bill of rights, and a legal code, which you can read here. Our government has four branches:

The Legislature consists of the Regional Assembly (RA), which votes to enact and amend legislation. Discussions in the RA are moderated by the Speaker, who is elected from among the RA members, and their Deputies. Everyone with a nation in the region can apply to join the RA.

The Executive consists of the Delegate, Vice Delegate, the Cabinet of Ministers, and the Executive Staff. The Delegate and Vice Delegate are elected by the RA, and are accountable to it. The Ministers are appointed by the Delegate, and each one of them manage their own staff. Together, the Executive runs the day-to-day affairs of the government. Broad areas the Executive is responsible for include home affairs, foreign affairs, World Assembly affairs, communications, culture, and our military. Everyone with a nation in the region can apply to join the Executive Staff and work in one of the Ministries.

The Judiciary consists of a single court, which has two Associate Justices and one Chief Justice. All Justices are elected by the RA, and are accountable to it. The court can authoritatively answer questions of law, void actions of other officials that have been brought for review, and decide criminal cases. Interacting with the Judiciary is the Attorney General, also elected by the RA, who serves as the chief prosecutor in criminal trials and as legal counsel to the Executive.

The Security Council is generally considered as a separate branch. It is a body of members that monitor the region for security purposes. They help protect the in-game delegacy, help with delegacy transitions during elections, and also provide a mechanism of response in the case of an illegal in-game delegate. They are accountable to the RA.

You can find a list of current government officials here.

Ways to Get Involved

The best way to start getting involved is to apply for citizenship. Citizenship allows you to access all forum areas and join the various government and community activities. The application process should be easy and fast, and the only prerequisite is having a nation in the region. Once you are a citizen, you will also be eligible to vote and be a candidate in elections for the various government offices, such as Delegate and Vice Delegate - there is an election roughly every two months.

If the description of the government has enticed you, you should definitely consider contributing in the various branches! As a citizen, you can take part in the Regional Assembly, where you can legislate and scrutinize the government. You can also apply to join the Executive Staff, and get involved in any Ministry that interests you.

If you would like to poke around the forum and interact with our community before deciding to become a citizen, you should register your residency. Once you do so, you will be able to access most of the areas of this forum and join the various other activities. Here is a sample:

You can participate in our Role Play section, where you can write the story of your nation, interact with your neighbours on The North Pacific map, and join the Democratic Union.

You can drop by our World Assembly section, to discuss resolutions at vote, draft your own resolutions, and determine how our WA Delegate represents us in the World Assembly.

If you want to experience and learn about the military gameplay, one of the most exciting aspects of the game, you can enlist in the North Pacific Army and start serving TNP as a proud soldier!

Questions?

If you have more questions, you can check for answers in the The North Pacific FAQs. The Yellow Pages in particular provide a comprehensive guide to the region in a single thread.

If you cannot find the answer to your questions there, or if you are having any trouble with the forum, you can contact our forum administrators and global moderators here.

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July 11th: Burr-Hamilton Duel
Topic Started: Jul 11 2018, 01:36 PM (73 Views)
St George
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Formerly madjack

In a duel held in Weehawken, New Jersey, Vice President Aaron Burr fatally shoots his long-time political antagonist Alexander Hamilton. Hamilton, a leading Federalist and the chief architect of America’s political economy, died the following day.

Alexander Hamilton, born on the Caribbean island of Nevis, came to the American colonies in 1773 as a poor immigrant. (There is some controversy as to the year of his birth, but it was either 1755 or 1757.) In 1776, he joined the Continental Army in the American Revolution, and his relentless energy and remarkable intelligence brought him to the attention of General George Washington, who took him on as an aid. Ten years later, Hamilton served as a delegate to the Constitutional Convention, and he led the fight to win ratification of the final document, which created the kind of strong, centralized government that he favored. In 1789, he was appointed the first secretary of the treasury by President Washington, and during the next six years he crafted a sophisticated monetary policy that saved the young U.S. government from collapse. With the emergence of political parties, Hamilton was regarded as a leader of the Federalists.

Aaron Burr, born into a prestigious New Jersey family in 1756, was also intellectually gifted, and he graduated from the College of New Jersey (later Princeton) at the age of 17. He joined the Continental Army in 1775 and distinguished himself during the Patriot attack on Quebec. A masterful politician, he was elected to the New State Assembly in 1783 and later served as state attorney. In 1790, he defeated Alexander Hamilton’s father-in-law in a race for the U.S. Senate.

Hamilton came to detest Burr, whom he regarded as a dangerous opportunist, and he often spoke ill of him. When Burr ran for the vice presidency in 1796 on Thomas Jefferson’s Democratic-Republican ticket (the forerunner of the Democratic Party), Hamilton launched a series of public attacks against Burr, stating, “I feel it is a religious duty to oppose his career.” John Adams won the presidency, and in 1797 Burr left the Senate and returned to the New York Assembly.

In 1800, Jefferson chose Burr again as his running mate. Burr aided the Democratic-Republican ticket by publishing a confidential document that Hamilton had written criticizing his fellow Federalist President John Adams. This caused a rift in the Federalists and helped Jefferson and Burr win the election with 73 electoral votes each.

Under the electoral procedure then prevailing, president and vice president were not voted for separately; the candidate who received the most votes was elected president, and the second in line, vice president. The vote then went to the House of Representatives. What at first seemed but an electoral technicality–handing Jefferson victory over his running mate–developed into a major constitutional crisis when Federalists in the lame-duck Congress threw their support behind Burr. After a remarkable 35 tie votes, a small group of Federalists changed sides and voted in Jefferson’s favor. Alexander Hamilton, who had supported Jefferson as the lesser of two evils, was instrumental in breaking the deadlock.

Burr became vice president, but Jefferson grew apart from him, and he did not support Burr’s renomination to a second term in 1804. That year, a faction of New York Federalists, who had found their fortunes drastically diminished after the ascendance of Jefferson, sought to enlist the disgruntled Burr into their party and elect him governor. Hamilton campaigned against Burr with great fervor, and Burr lost the Federalist nomination and then, running as an independent for governor, the election. In the campaign, Burr’s character was savagely attacked by Hamilton and others, and after the election he resolved to restore his reputation by challenging Hamilton to a duel, or an “affair of honor,” as they were known.

Affairs of honor were commonplace in America at the time, and the complex rules governing them usually led to an honorable resolution before any actual firing of weapons. In fact, the outspoken Hamilton had been involved in several affairs of honor in his life, and he had resolved most of them peaceably. No such recourse was found with Burr, however, and on July 11, 1804, the enemies met at 7 a.m. at the dueling grounds near Weehawken, New Jersey. It was the same spot where Hamilton’s son had died defending his father’s honor in 1801.

There are conflicting accounts of what happened next. According to Hamilton’s “second”–his assistant and witness in the duel–Hamilton decided the duel was morally wrong and deliberately fired into the air. Burr’s second claimed that Hamilton fired at Burr and missed. What happened next is agreed upon: Burr shot Hamilton in the stomach, and the bullet lodged next to his spine. Hamilton was taken back to New York, and he died the next afternoon.

Few affairs of honor actually resulted in deaths, and the nation was outraged by the killing of a man as eminent as Alexander Hamilton. Charged with murder in New York and New Jersey, Burr, still vice president, returned to Washington, D.C., where he finished his term immune from prosecution.

In 1805, Burr, thoroughly discredited, concocted a plot with James Wilkinson, commander-in-chief of the U.S. Army, to seize the Louisiana Territory and establish an independent empire, which Burr, presumably, would lead. He contacted the British government and unsuccessfully pleaded for assistance in the scheme. Later, when border trouble with Spanish Mexico heated up, Burr and Wilkinson conspired to seize territory in Spanish America for the same purpose.

In the fall of 1806, Burr led a group of well-armed colonists toward New Orleans, prompting an immediate U.S. investigation. General Wilkinson, in an effort to save himself, turned against Burr and sent dispatches to Washington accusing Burr of treason. In February 1807, Burr was arrested in Louisiana for treason and sent to Virginia to be tried in a U.S. court. In September, he was acquitted on a technicality. Nevertheless, public opinion condemned him as a traitor, and he fled to Europe. He later returned to private life in New York, the murder charges against him forgotten. He died in 1836.
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Whoa, a Louisiana Empire? That would be an excellent Althistory scenario!
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